Yellowstone Thermal Features

Just a small sample of photos - I have hundreds more. If you are interested in any of these (or other) scenery shots, please contact me at sbbyland@aol.com

Old Faithful Geyser - you sort of have to start with this feature - it goes off about every 90 minutes, it's close to the visitor center and it goes off at regular intervals. It's a good confidence builder.

 

 

I suppose the key to successfully photographing Old Faithful Geyser has to do with showing up. Of course, it helps to have nice weather and all that. Since bad weather doesn't last forever in Yellowstone, you stand a pretty good chance of getting a decent shot. Hopefully, you can get the sun behind you with the wind blowing to one side or the other. It doesn't last long, though, sneeze and you might miss the peak.


You really can't even hope to watch Old Faithful alone unless you get up REALLY early. Fortunately, there's plenty of room. Just get there early enough to make sure you get the spot you want.


 

Once you've cut your teeth on an easy geiser like Old Faithful, then you move on to something a bit more challenging. Grand Geyser is a great next step. It is one of the largest and goes off about once a day. Problem is that it is a bit tough to predict.


I waited about 3 hours for these shots. A lot of people waited closer to 6 hours. We all got a good laugh when it was over and a group of people sat down and asked what the crowd was hoping to see. If you position yourself just right, you can sometimes catch a rainbow in the mist (as in the above photo).

This quirky geyser makes you think that it is going to go off about every 20 minutes in it's eruption "window" by filling the pool and then, either going off, or just draining with a little wimper. The long wait was worth it.

 

 

Daisy Geyser, which gets its name from the colorful runoff, it a place you hit when you have a little confidence. In other words, it's a long walk and not that spectacular as eruptions go. The bacterial mat, however, is rather pretty. Haul your equipment there, chat with old and new friends, and start to think of yourself as a pro.


Mudpots are not for the faint of heart. They are a bear to photograph. Your first attempt will probably yield crap. People bump your tripod and ask lots of stupid questions (and no, there are park rules against killing other tourists). Best idea is to scrap everything you learned and shoot sort of into the sun. The shadows on the close side will give some contrast. No way to time them, just take a hundred shots and cross your fingers.

 

The Artist Paintpots were designed to make me carry lots of equipment up lots of stairs and such to get this shot


Biscuit Basin geyser area at sunset


 

Biscuit Basin geyser area


Dead trees in the thermal features of Biscuit Basin

 

 

Biscuit Basin geyser area


Biscuit Basin geyser area

 

 

Biscuit Basin geyser area at sunset 


Chromatic Pool

 

 

Emerald Spring


Firehole Lake Drive

 

 

Firehole Lake Drive


Grand Prismatic Spring (right and below) - I took this from an overlook - if anyone tells you to climb all the way to the top, just know that there is an even chance that you will fall and hurt yourself coming down the trecherous hill

 

   

 

Mammoth Hot Springs


Orange Mound at Mammoth Hot Springs

 

 

Orange Mound at Mammoth Hot Springs


Mammoth Hot Springs

 

 

Bacterial Mat at Mammoth Hot Springs


Bacterial Mat at Mammoth Hot Springs - signs everywhere ask you not to write your initials in the delicate mat.

 

  Bacterial Mat at Mammoth Hot Springs - feel free to rub the face of any vandals into the very hot water coming from the hot springs

Bacterial Mat at Mammoth Hot Springs  

  Mammoth Hot Springs

Upper Geyser Basin  

  Upper Geyser Basin

Upper Geyser Basin  

  White Dome Geyser